The Cartographic Propositions of Raumforschung und Raumordnung, 1936-1955: from Territorial Expansion to Defeat and Division

Authors

  • Matthew Mingus

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14512/rur.84

Abstract

This paper examines shifts in the design of, use of and rhetoric accompanying maps published in the periodical Raumforschung und Raumordnung from 1936 through 1955. In the discussion of these maps published prior to and during the Second World War, special attention is paid to the depiction of the German Empire, the incorporation of Austria into maps of the Third Reich, and cartographic portrayals
of Poland and other eastern European territory. Particularly in-depth investigation into articles and maps written and drawn by Reinhold Niemeyer and Rudolf Hoffmann is also undertaken here. In evaluating the maps published in Raumforschung
und Raumordnung (RuR) after Germany’s defeat, this paper focuses on depictions of the new Federal Republic of Germany and the mapping of its relationship, geographically, to the German Democratic Republic. While the content of the maps published in RuR reflected the territorial reality of its German cartographers and authors – from violent expansionism to defeat, territorial diminution and a split into two distinct nation states –, this paper argues that many of the cartographic strategies employed in its pages remained relatively consistent over time.

Published

2021-10-29

How to Cite

Mingus, M. (2021). The Cartographic Propositions of Raumforschung und Raumordnung, 1936-1955: from Territorial Expansion to Defeat and Division. Raumforschung Und Raumordnung | Spatial Research and Planning. https://doi.org/10.14512/rur.84

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