Knowledge Hubs in the German Urban System: Identifying Hubs by Combining Network and Territorial Perspectives

Authors

  • Anna Growe Fakultät Raumplanung, Technische Universität Dortmund, August-Schmidt-Straße 10, 44227, Dortmund, Deutschland
  • Hans H. Blotevogel Fakultät Raumplanung, Technische Universität Dortmund, August-Schmidt-Straße 10, 44227, Dortmund, Deutschland

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1007/s13147-011-0087-1

Keywords:

Hubs, Space of places, Space of flows, Knowledge economy, Metropolitan regions, Germany

Abstract

This paper identifies hubs of knowledge-based labour in the German urban system from two perspectives: the importance of a metropolitan region as a place and the importance of a metropolitan region as an organisational node. This combination of a network perspective with a territorial perspective enables the identification of hubs. From the functional perspective, hubs are understood as important nodes of national and global networks, established by flows of people, goods, capital and information as well as by organisational and power relations. From the territorial perspective, hubs are understood as spatial clusters of organisations (firms, public authorities, non-governmental organisations). The functional focus of the paper lies on knowledge-based services. Based on data about employment and multi-branch advanced producer service firms, four main types of metropolitan regions are identified: growing knowledge hubs, stagnating knowledge hubs, stagnating knowledge regions and catch-up knowledge regions. The results show an affinity between knowledge-based work and bigger metropolitan regions as well as an east-west divide in the German urban system.

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Published

2011-06-30

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Section

Research Article

How to Cite

1.
Growe A, H. Blotevogel H. Knowledge Hubs in the German Urban System: Identifying Hubs by Combining Network and Territorial Perspectives. RuR [Internet]. 2011 Jun. 30 [cited 2024 May 25];69(3):175–185. Available from: https://rur.oekom.de/index.php/rur/article/view/786

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